Darkside  

Voltar   Darkside > Darkside > Comunidade

Responder
 
Thread Tools
Jeep
fagmin
 

XFIRE ID: ds-jeep Steam ID: jeep_ds
Default Fatwa contra vacinas na Indonesia

09-11-18, 08:31 #1
tl; dr;

Olha a historia, sarampo comendo solto na indonesia, importam vacina da india, conseguem cobrir 90% da populacao, indices dropam +90%. Clericos descobrem que vacina tem componentes retirados de porcos e declaram atraves de uma fatwa que a vacina é haram "mas que tudo bem por enquanto", so que varias cidades decidem proibir e indices desabam, pelo que entendi nao em todos, mas o golpe foi geral. Eu achei as noticias meio picadas, alguem mais viu sobre isso?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-...y-mui/10147040

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018...tes-plummeting

As the bell rang on a recent morning at an elementary school here and pupils filled the classrooms, anxious adults crowded the corridors outside. It was vaccination day, but many parents in this North Sumatra village did not want their children immunized with a new measles-rubella (MR) vaccine. Some told the teacher their children were at home, not feeling well. Others were there to make sure their kids didn't get the jab. They whispered the reason with disgust: The vaccine "contains elements of pork." By the time the vaccination team left, only six out of 38 students had been immunized.

Millions of parents around Indonesia have eschewed the vaccine in recent months, after Islamic clerics declared the MR vaccine "haram," or forbidden under Islamic law because pig components are used in its manufacturing. Vaccine coverage has plummeted as a result, alarming public health experts who worry that the world's largest Muslim-majority country could see new waves of measles and more miscarriages and birth defects resulting from rubella infections during pregnancy.

Indonesia has long used a locally produced measles vaccine as part of its childhood vaccination scheme, but coverage has been patchy, and until recently, the country had one of the highest measles burdens in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Last year, as part of a WHO-led plan to eliminate measles and rubella globally by 2020, Indonesia switched to a combined MR vaccine, produced by the Serum Institute of India in Mumbai. The Ministry of Health launched an ambitious catchup campaign targeting 67 million children aged 9 months to 15 years. The first phase, in 2017 on the island of Java, was a success; all six provinces reached the 95% coverage target, and measles and rubella cases dropped by more than 90%.

But the rollout to the rest of the country, originally scheduled for August and September of this year, ran into trouble. Just before it began, the Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI) of the Riau Islands, a provincial Islamic body, raised concerns that the new MR vaccine had not been certified as "halal," or lawful, by the central MUI in Jakarta, the highest authority in such matters. The letter asked for vaccinations to be postponed. The news quickly spread throughout the country, stoking distrust among parents.

To salvage the campaign, the health ministry in August lobbied the central MUI to issue a fatwa—a ruling under Islamic law—declaring the vaccine halal. Instead, the council declared the MR vaccine haram, based on its ingredients and manufacturing process. Like many vaccines, it is made using several porcine components. Trypsin, an enzyme, helps separate the cells in which the vaccine viruses are grown from their glass container. Gelatin derived from pigs' skin serves as a stabilizer, protecting vaccine viruses as they are freeze-dried.

MUI took pains not to block the vaccination campaign. It ruled that parents could still have their children vaccinated, given the need to protect public health. "Trusted experts have explained the dangers posed by not being immunized," MUI said, a message it reiterated at a public consultation with Health Minister Nila Moeloek on 18 September.

But local clerics and confused parents have drawn their own conclusions. In contrast to the success on Java, coverage of children on other islands has reached only 68% so far, according to the health ministry, which did not respond to interview requests. In some regions it is far worse—just 8% in Aceh, for example, a province ruled by sharia law.

A spokesperson for WHO's country office in Jakarta notes that Indonesia is hardly the only country where trust in vaccination has eroded and says WHO remains optimistic about the campaign. Although the fatwa "has caused some confusion at local levels, it is in fact clear in its directive and ultimately supportive" of vaccination, the spokesperson wrote in an email. WHO is working with the Indonesian government, which has extended the catch-up campaign until December, to expand the coverage.

Failure could be a major setback for public health. Measles can cause deafness, blindness, seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death; vaccination coverage needs to be at 95% to reach herd immunity, in which even nonvaccinated people are protected. That threshold is about 80% for rubella. At lower levels, a paradoxical effect can occur: Some women who would otherwise have an innocuous infection early in life now catch the virus while pregnant, raising their risk of miscarriage or giving birth to babies with congenital rubella syndrome—whose symptoms include blindness, deafness, heart defects, and mental disabilities. "We can't play" with the MR vaccine, says Elizabeth Jane Soepardi, an independent public health expert who until January was director of disease surveillance and quarantine at the health ministry. Low vaccination rates "could mean a boomerang for us," she says.

There is no ready alternative; no MR vaccines have been certified as halal anywhere. (Indonesia's previous measles vaccine didn't have a halal certificate either, which has not hampered its use.) Arifianto Apin, a Muslim pediatrician in Jakarta who advocates for vaccination within the Indonesian Pediatric Society, says education may help. Clerics in many Muslim countries have concluded that gelatin in vaccines is halal because it has undergone hydrolysis, a chemical transformation that purifies it under an Islamic legal concept called istihalah. And in 2013, the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore declared a rotavirus vaccine halal despite the use of trypsin; it ruled that the enzyme had been made pure by dilution and the addition of other pure compounds, which is known as istihlak. If Muslim parents learn about the diverse legal views within Islam, Apin says, "they won't hesitate to vaccinate their children."

If that doesn't happen, the only solution is to develop a halal vaccine as soon as possible, says Art Reingold, an epidemiologist at the University of California, Berkeley. Neni Nurainy, the lead scientist at Indonesia's state-owned vaccine company, Bio Farma, in Bandung notes that nonporcine vaccine stabilizers exist, for instance; the company plans to start to investigate bovine gelatin as a replacement. But development and clinical trials could take 6 to 10 years, she says. "In the meantime, many will be made ill and some may die avoidable deaths," Reingold says.

WHO, however, is steering clear of the religious debate and won't recommend the development of a halal vaccine. "WHO works with regulatory authorities and manufacturers to ensure vaccines have the highest standards of safety and efficacy," the spokesperson says. "We don't assess vaccines on other criteria."





Jeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Jeep
fagmin
 

XFIRE ID: ds-jeep Steam ID: jeep_ds
09-11-18, 08:34 #2
tem uma da uol de setembro

https://noticias.uol.com.br/ultimas-...-indonesia.htm

Ricardo Pérez-Solero Llosa.

Jacarta, 24 set (EFE).- Funcionários do Ministério da Saúde da Indonésia encontraram uma recepção nada calorosa quando chegaram a um povoado da ilha de Célebes, durante uma campanha de vacinação rejeitada por parte da população muçulmana porque a vacina contém vestígios de porco.

Os moradores de Popayato, na província de Gorontalo, receberam os agentes com facões e são um dos exemplos que o subchefe do gabinete presidencial, Yanuar Nugroho, mencionou para alertar do risco de descumprir os objetivos do programa contra o sarampo e a rubéola.

"Alguns (enfermeiros) foram ameaçados com facões porque os pais disseram que não queriam (vacinar os filhos), que é haram (proibido pela lei islâmica)", disse Yunuar recentemente ao jornal local "Tempo".

A Indonésia começou em 2017 a primeira fase do programa de vacinação contra estas duas doenças em 35 milhões de crianças de entre nove meses e 15 anos na ilha de Java, onde vivem mais da metade dos 260 milhões de habitantes do país.

O ministério de Saúde, apoiado pelo Unicef e pela Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS), realiza desde agosto deste ano a segunda fase no resto do país, que a princípio termina este mês.

Segundo dados da OMS de setembro, a Indonésia está entre os dez primeiros países do mundo com mais casos de sarampo e é o primeiro da lista no sudeste asiático, sem contar com a Índia, em número de casos de rubéola, ambos registrados nos últimos 12 meses.

No entanto, o Conselho de Ulemás da Indonésia (MUI) expressou dúvidas sobre a vacina poucos dias antes de começar o programa e recomendou aos muçulmanos que esperassem até que a organização religiosa a catalogasse como "halal" (aprovado no Islã).

Finalmente o MUI analisou a vacina e emitiu uma fatwa em 20 de agosto para permitir seu uso, argumentando riscos de saúde e a falta de alternativas, embora não a tenha denominado "halal".

Cerca de 90% dos indonésios são muçulmanos e praticam em sua maioria uma forma moderada do Islã, mas as facções fundamentalistas atrasaram a vacinação em províncias como Aceh, a única regida pela "sharia" - ou lei islâmica -, ou nas Ilhas de Riau (ambas a oeste).

O secretário do MUI nas Ilhas de Riau, Ustadz Santoso, disse ao jornal "Jakarta Post", dois dias depois de sua organização emitir a fatwa, que, "se a vacina é tão importante, então pedimos ao governo para criar uma (vacina) 'halal' e segura para os muçulmanos" e negou que haja risco de um surto de rubéola em sua região.

Durante um simpósio sobre a vacina realizado em Jacarta, a ministra da Saúde, Nila Moeloek, considerou que a dispersão geográfica do país é uma das dificuldades para a campanha.

O presidente do MUI, Marouf Amin, que concorre como vice na chapa do presidente da Inmdonésia, Joko Widodo, nas eleições gerais de abril de 2019, lamentou a falta de progresso da vacina, que "é de apenas 48%", disse durante o debate transmitido ao vivo.

A médica do Unicef Kenny Peetosutan, que colabora na campanha de vacinação, afirmou que o objetivo é atingir 95% das 32 milhões de crianças incluídas na segunda fase de vacinação.

"Com esta alta cobertura, esperamos que não haja oportunidade para que o vírus seja transmitido de pessoa para pessoa, mas tem que ser em todos os níveis, não só em nível nacional, se não em cada província, em cada município e subdistrito a cobertura tem que ser igualmente alta", disse à Agência EFE Peetosutan.

Segundo a médica, a alta taxa de vacinação garante imunidade também para os que não podem se vacinar, como idosos, pessoas tomando determinada medicação e mulheres grávidas.

Em Aceh, a cobertura atinge atualmente 7% da população, disse ao portal de notícias local "Detik" o secretário da Associação Indonésia de Pediatria, o médico Aslinar, que como muitos indonésios utiliza um só nome.

O Ministério da Saúde ignorou os pedidos enviados pela EFE de fornecer dados atualizados sobre a cobertura da campanha.

O sarampo pode causar danos cerebrais e inclusive a morte, enquanto a rubéola pode provocar más-formações congênitas, abortos e a morte prematura do feto se a mãe contrair a doença durante a gravidez.

Jeep is offline   Reply With Quote
percezione
Trooper
 

Steam ID: brunorei
09-11-18, 08:50 #3
Deixa morrer ué...

percezione is offline   Reply With Quote
Kensha
Trooper
 

Gamertag: ksnrodrigoms PSN ID: rodrigo_machado
09-11-18, 09:02 #4
o problema eh que eh contagioso neh brunorei

Kensha is offline   Reply With Quote
David
Robson
 

09-11-18, 11:44 #5
Vacina não tem essa de faz quem quer. Precisa de imunidade de grupo para proteger quem tomou a vacina e não consegue imunidade.

David is offline   Reply With Quote
Factor X
Trooper
 

Steam ID: marceloumeda
09-11-18, 12:11 #6
minha mãe é contra vacina, já tentei tanto explicar que ela tá sendo ridícula, mas tá foda. Cada vez que surge o assunto na famíla, rola textão, dr e os caralhos. De qualquer forma, eu e meus 5 irmãos fomos todos devidamente vacinados, então se ela quer levantar essa bandeira agora, foda-se uaheuaa

Mostro uma notícia dessa pra ela e ela tem um monte de argumento bosta pra combater, vacina desse tipo de doença deveria ser obrigatório e pronto.

Factor X is offline   Reply With Quote
Kamikaze-Vesgo
Trooper
 

09-11-18, 12:45 #7
Fico impressionado como as pessoas ainda levam a sério a religião, se for pra procurar paz de espirito até vai, agora ser ignorante PQP!!

Mesma coisa da esquerda hoje em dia, so ler um pouco pra saber que as ideia da esquerda não fazem sentido algum.

Kamikaze-Vesgo is offline   Reply With Quote
VXXXV
Trooper
 

PSN ID: vcraraujo XFIRE ID: vcraraujo
09-11-18, 13:32 #8
Esse mundo ta ficando cada dia mais maluco....

VXXXV is offline   Reply With Quote
zorba
Trooper
 

Steam ID: luizkowalski
09-11-18, 14:15 #9
mano, na moral mesmo
islam tem que acabar
foda-se essa merda

zorba esta conectado agora   Reply With Quote
Zigfried
Trooper
 

XFIRE ID: k00patroopa Steam ID: koopatroopa_
09-11-18, 14:18 #10
Se fosse só a religião que pregasse antivacina seria mais fácil de resolver.

Zigfried is offline   Reply With Quote
percezione
Trooper
 

Steam ID: brunorei
09-11-18, 17:35 #11
Quote:
Postado por zorba Mostrar Post
mano, na moral mesmo
islam tem que acabar
foda-se essa merda
Islam e todas as outras merdas q chamam de religião, como evangélicos, católicos e os caralho
Tudo estelionatario...

percezione is offline   Reply With Quote
Blazed
Trooper
 

09-11-18, 18:02 #12
o que configura uma religião?

Blazed is offline   Reply With Quote
Zigfried
Trooper
 

XFIRE ID: k00patroopa Steam ID: koopatroopa_
09-11-18, 18:45 #13
qlqr grupo, comunidade que praticam seitas com sacrifícios, orgias, rezas, orações, hinos, cantos ou isenção de taxas e impostos para um ou mais seres místicos, mágicos, divinos ou sobrenaturais nas quais não há comprovação científica ou empírica de sua existência

Zigfried is offline   Reply With Quote
Baron
Trooper
 

09-11-18, 19:01 #14
Esquerdismo é religião.

Lembrando que tinha gente que estava doente e queria tocar Stalin pra se curar.

Baron is offline   Reply With Quote
troy
Trooper
 

12-11-18, 00:52 #15
Essa é uma realidade brasileira pois muita gente têm ignorado a vacina, existem muitos mitos sobre a vacinação e tem faltado instrução para a população.

A questão religiosa é mil vezes mais delicada, muito difícil de mexer. É um desafio interno que os líderes vão ter que enfrentar. Uma solução simples seria mudar a composição da vacina para atender as demandas religiosas.

troy is offline   Reply With Quote
Never Ping
Trooper
 

Gamertag: Willian Braga XFIRE ID: neverping Steam ID: neverping
12-11-18, 10:41 #16
Crossfit é religião?

Never Ping is offline   Reply With Quote
Kamikaze-Vesgo
Trooper
 

12-11-18, 12:30 #17
Quote:
Postado por Never Ping Mostrar Post
Crossfit é religião?
Sim, pois é necessário fazer sacrifícios e tem um monte de bobo pregando dizendo que é legal.

Kamikaze-Vesgo is offline   Reply With Quote
kuidow
Trooper
 

12-11-18, 15:45 #18
Selecao natural.

kuidow is offline   Reply With Quote
Responder

Thread Tools

Regras de postagem
Você não pode criar novos tópicos
Você não pode postar
Você não pode enviar anexos
Você não pode editar seus posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Atalho para Fóruns



O formato de hora é GMT -2. horário: 23:14.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.